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education and the contacted bashar. two years almost to the day later the ambassador to the united states called me up and was also a friend and also an academic. dean of computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said, it's on. and i had forgotten about this whole thing. and i said, what's on? and the set to well, the president wants to meet with you and so common with him in may and june of that year extensively, it's viewed his wife and many other syrian officials. >> what was the first meeting like? >> well, after the pleasantries in after i explained why i wanted to do this my first substantive sentence to him was, mr. president, you know i'm not an apologist for syria. of writing this book on you, and of going to criticize you. and he said, that's fine. i know you will criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and in the past you criticize my father's policy, but you're always fair and objective. then i told him, one of the worst things you never did. >> what's that? >> you let it be known the like phil collins music, the rock star from england.
or anywhere in the united states and all they need is a computer and an internet connection with an auto dialer company and the auto dialer company then has a connection to carriers and the telephone network or. the auto dialer -- the lead generator is just trying to find people for these products or services for these rachel calls so they are just going to blast out calls. some of these lead generators are calling the phone book and going sequentially through numbers and looking for bodies a lot like e-mail spam because the costs are so much low for now. the startup costs are lower, almost zero as brett mentioned earlier. you can get dialing in a few hours and you don't need a pbx. you don't need lots of copper line and he don't even need a phone. you just need your computer and internet connection, so they will send out these calls going through an auto dialer which will put them into the telephone network and they will go out all over the country. and a very small percentage of people and up answering them in listening to the message and the message will be like one you may have heard
who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could do, and it turns out to have been, to have terrible consequences. that is basically what happened here. >> rose: american foreign policy and a dexter filkins story. when we come back. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additional funding provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the 2012 election last night, president obama and mitt romney balanced it out in the third and final debate. at lynn university in boca raton florida, the suggest was foreign policy but discussion often veered toward domestic concerns as well, the two men addressed a range o
is running for the united states senate. you know very well by plan is my own. i have sought the expert opinions of those outside to get the brightest and the best and every word of that plan has been cited either in the online plan or in print. when you got into this race as the democrats at the thought -- as a democrat and you thought is going to be a coronation and now you are in a serious race with a serious woman. >> we're going to move on to the next question. >> in this tide of rising national debt, i was wondering about congressional earmarked. do you support elimination of them? here is one -- $1.9 million for a water taxi to pleasure beach in bridgeport. >> first call me respond to this last allegation. there is no doubt we'll look at her jobs plan, there are entire paragraphs and sentences lifted from the house republican website, from the cato institute. i don't know what you call it, but all i am saying is this is not a plan rooted in what best for the state of connecticut. this is a plan written by people in washington. when that mcmahon's idea that by simply giving a bunc
by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of them on the way to taiwan. so, i was confident that no one was going to challenge the fleet that we were sending there. this -- and in fact, they did not challenge it even before our two carrier battle ships arrived in taiwan, the crisis was over and the maneuvers had been su
of the united states or i am without a seat. [laughter] i have no intention of standing. [laughter] >> i must say i have traveled to banquet circuits for years. i never understood the logistics of dinners like this and how the absence of one individual could cause three of us not to have seats. [laughter] >> vice president, i'm glad to see you here tonight. you said you want to give america back to the little guy. [laughter] mr. president, i am that man. [laughter] >> as i looked out at the ties this evening, i realize i have not seen so many people so well-dressed since i went to a come-as-you-are party. >> a lot of good news from yugoslavia, there's one less name for me to remember. [laughter] [applause] >> you know what this world really needs? it really needs more world leaders named al smith. [laughter] >> it is an honor to share the dias with a descendent of al smith. your great grandfather was my favorite kind of governor. [laughter] the kind who ran for president and lost. [laughter] >> all of that al smith program at c-span.org/thecontenders, and tonight's dinner starting at 9 p.m. e
. is in the interest of the united states to solve this and get a two-state solution to this? various members of this current administration have said so, and if that's true it would be good to succeed. there are others who are not so sure that it's achievable of that political capital is worth spending on a. that's an important question, important decision for the next administration is the next president wants to do this, he's going to have to build a domestic constituency to overcome opposition. on the question of the iran syria hezbollah act, the administration will have decisions to make about sanctions, about diplomacy, about war. if the iranian regime comes to the table with serious intent, for any reason, either because sanctions are fighting so hard or because they are threats of military strike, or for any other reason, my question as an individual is with the american government take yes for an answer, or will the american government have conditions that are, cannot be met by the other side? and with the administration even consider what was previously called grand bargain, which w
at an advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the question is addre
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
that it goes unremarked upon. if you want to know about a country look at the map of the united states in terms of the harbors from the east coast of the united states, the 13 colonies jam packed with natural harbors. the coast of africa collectively few good natural harbors but the east coast was packed with them and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't
. >> when i'm president of the united states, that unemployment rate is going to come down not because people are giving up and dropping out of the workforce but because we are creating more jobs. i will create jobs and get america working again. >>reporter: governor romney took aims at president obama's plan to raise taxes on wealthy americans by $1 trillion saying that hits the small job market unduly hard and could result in 700,000 jobs simply evaporating. >>trace: we mention governor romney's second battle ground state the day. how is he tailoring the message to the different communities he is visiting? >>reporter: when he comes to st. petersburg area on the west coast of florida he will talk about medicare. it is an important issue through the entire state of florida. early today in virginia he was in coal country meeting with out of the work coal miners talking about what he sees his vision for coal versus president obama's vision. governor romney has been critical of the coal in the past but insists he is a friend and says president obama would be hostile. here is governor romn
, the united states has made all these mistakes, kind of like a colonial power down through the years. >> right. >> obama spends a lot of time apologizing for america. do you think that will come out in the debate tonight? >> i hope so. romney has shown an ability to be very tough debater while still being very kind. it's a nice combo platter he has, but you have with obama the guy who denied american exceptionalism. we're the only non-imperialist superpower in the history of the world. is he unaware of that? oh, yes, i'm sure english, they think they are exceptional, too. that was his response to american exceptionalism. you had him bowing for all of the world leaders. you had him leading from behind during the arab spring which these guys were so enthusiastic about, and we see the result of it, with the death of our ambassador and three other americans. no, obama's view is not that america is an exceptional country, and i hope that does come out. >> steve mcmahon, we could have actually landed troops in benghazi. that is now coming out. the president actually met with leon panetta, and nothin
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
one of which has the potential to decide who the next president of the united states will be. let's begin this hour's coverage in iowa where president obama kicked off a two-day coast-to-coast swing through eight states. he's calling it a campaign marathon extravaganza. likening it to an all-nighter. no surprise his itinerary consistents almost entirely of battleground states. cnn's chief white house correspondent jessica yellin is traveling with the president. >> reporter: wolf, president obama is hopping around the nation stumping for early votes and undecided voters. it's the kind of whirlwind tour you usually see in the last 48 hours before election day. the fact they're doing it 13 days before the ballots are cast is a sign just how important the early vote is to this campaign. now, from davenport, iowa, he heads to colorado, then he has stops in florida, virginia, again in ohio. he's going to las vegas, nevada, overnight. he also stops in las vegas -- in los angeles where he will be taping with jay leno and in chicago, illinois, where he'll be casting his own early ballot. h
tells well. the time i served in the united states senate i've been an independent voice for the people in the state and i've gotten results from the people of the state. in this campaign today, seven newspapers have made an editorial the as to who they would endorse. and all seven endorsed my candidacy. one of the reasons, not the only but one of the reasons that those newspapers endorsed me from the spread to california and a lot of places in between because of my record and the results that i achieved for the people in the state either leading the fight to cut the payroll tax for millions of americans and in pennsylvania so they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the economy, and i have the honor to have ser
there will be changes in the united states senate, if tim is in, he will be in there for the same folks he's campaigning for all of these years when he was chair of the democratic national committee, ignoring the needs, dire needs of people in virginia. i want to see change in washington, those positive, constructive ideas that can get this country going in the right direction. i believe we ought to get united behind the mission of sending a message to the world that america is open for business again. i think that anybody who pays taxes should be on our side unless you want to pay higher taxes. if you use electricity, you ought on our side. if you want more affordable electricity. if you drive a car and don't like the fact you're paying over $30 more every time you fill up, you ought to be on our side. if you agree with me doctors and patients ought to be making health care decisions rather then panels of bureaucrats up in washington, you ought to be on our side. if you're working for a living or if you want a job, the approach i have been advocating has proven to work. over 300,000 net new jobs create
. still, turkish lawmakers today voted to authorize cross border attacks. in the united states, secretary of state, hillary clinton, called the turkish foreign minister and pled the united states support. syria was the ally of turkey but now it is a bitter enemy after syria erupted in a bloody civil war 19 months ago, a violent revolution which human rights groups say has killed some 30,000 people. the chief fox correspondent, jonathan hunt, is like with the news. tensions are clearly still very high along that border. >>jonathan: they are. syria share as lengthy border with turkey. it is just on the syrian side of that border where the rebels are in many towns the strongest. it is across that border that many of the refugees from the civil war in syria have fled. it is a border that turkey says it has the right and more importantly, perhaps, the ability to defend. in so doing, at the moment, it has the complete support of the united states. listen. >> from our perspective, the response that turkey made was appropriate. it also was designed to strengthen the deterrent effect so these kind
and we must consider rush are number one enemy. number three it angers and alienates the united states and number four increasing the eighth against turkey whose aragon regime is backing the rebels. why is russia doing this? n there is continued disunity in the ranks of the rebels although as of this morning reportedly there is another chance they say to unify. they hopefully moscow won't be able to oust aside a number to the u.s. and turkey as of yet have not been willing to extend their syrian brother of however turkish prime minister erdogan is his strong and continues to be provoked by syrian shelling the influx of refugees he may take action. this is why in recent baseball in the shelling in turkeys horsing down of syrian jet flight from moscow to damascus russia has tried to -- by increasing the supply of national gas to turkey to maintain good relations between russia and turkey despite what's happening in syria. conclusion, moscow is taking a major middle east gamble with his policy in syria. at the gamble fails, and i think it will, hopefully if the u.s. gets them little more
. obviously, the campaign is for the united states senate. the filibuster has been used in this current united states senate all a long. hasn't been accused? >> i think every party will always see the other party abuses. i like the system. i like the requirement because to get 60 votes. requires working across the aisle. i think that's something i'm well-suited for. so i would not vote to get rid of the filibuster. sometimes it is abused by both parties. >> from 1917-1970, 50 cloture vote. this current senate, 109th cloture vote. what is going on? >> you have a dysfunctional senate. we haven't had a budget passed innocent in more than three years but someone mentioned the other day the last time the senate passed the budget, the apple ipad had not been invented yet. >> how can it be functional is the filibuster is always wearing its had? >> they can. we've had the filibuster for years and with a functional senate. as senator mccain said the other day this is the first time in 51 years that the senate hasn't passed a defense authorization bill. the problem right now, i don't think we will convi
. >> gavin: 150. -plus countries, every state in the united states. it begs the question with your history and the present work you're doing. what world fundamentally are we living in? >> a transforming one. frankly, in a lot of good ways. i think people are always surprised when they meet me, and they expect someone really gloomy and anxiety-ridden and depressed about the world because i'm covering a lot of things. but on global poverty we're making tremendous progress. on so many of these issues that i care about we're inching progress. global health issues. you know, i remember my first trip to africa, and i remember the thing that horrified me the most was how many blind people there were. every capital you would see these middle aged blind people begging and being led around by their children or likely grandchildren, and it was pretty horrifying. now river blindness has been dramatically reduced partly because of jimmy carter more than anybody else. dracoma also it's is also on its way out. you don't have people in their 30s routinely going blind around the world. so many other elemen
with the demonstrations themselves. but from their point of view, and this is, this is the dilemma from the united states too, this is the dilemma from the united states, you know, iran has exploited situations before. it has exploited situations before. there's the fear that it could exploit this one again, and that is why when we look, we do not know what to make of this group and where it stands on questions of democracy and participation and where it stands in its relationships with iran. we don't -- we have concerns about that. that are hampering our decision making. is there any other question? it's 12:00, we really need to close because of the cameras. so i guess i will say at this point thank you very much for coming. thank you to the panelists. [applause] and, again, we have a web site, www.mepc.org. i hope you visit it. [inaudible conversations] >> the middle east council wrapping up this discussion on foreign policy choices facing the next administration. we are going from this to the heritage foundation live now for a discussion on russia's role in the syrian civil war. this is just getting s
comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed's biography leonard cohen, all these people at the book festival among others. david maraniss is here with a book about obama. i was curious because all these books are so different in terms of authors's a
by our allies. i think the tension between israel and the united states was very unfortunate. i think also pulling our missile defense program out of poland and the way we did was also unfortunate in terms of, if you will, disrupting the relationship in some ways that existed between us. and then, of course, with regards to standing for our principles, when the students took to the streets in tehran and the people there protested, the green revolution occurred for the president to be silent, i thought, was an enormous mistake. we have to stand for our principles, stand for our allies, stand for a strong military and stand for a stronger economy. >> mr. president. >> america remains the one indispensable nation. and the world needs a strong america, and it is stronger now than when i came into office. because we ended the war in iraq, we were able to refocus our attention on not only the terrorist threat but also beginning a transition process in afghanistan. it also allowed us to refocus on alliances and relationships that had been neglected for a decade. and governor romney, our alli
is waiting for the united states to act. helima croft is with us, senior geopolitical strategist from barclays. what does that mean? they think the u.s. is going to come in? >> they were asking when the united states is going to come in. they said the security situation is deteriorating. increasing attacks on turkish soldiers coming from syria. they are wondering when the united states do what it did in libya really provide strong support for the rebels. i was sort of alarming them when i said i don't think the united states is going to come in any time soon so really turkey is on its own. dagen: tell us, helima, what's at stake here. syria doesn't produce much oil at all, and then turkey, but then you have to factor in iraq, the critical nature of the production out of iraq to offset what we've lost -- the world has lost rather coming out of iran. >> nowhere else can we add so much oil to the market from conventional supply as iraq. the report that just came out today talking about iraq going to 6 million barrels a day by 2020. no other country can put an additional 3 million barrels
rush-hour number one enemy." #3, it angers and alienates the united states. and increasingly irritates turkey. why is russia doing this? there is continued disunity in the ranks of the rebels, although after this morning, there's another chance they say to reunify. hopefully, scout, think they won't be able to oust assad. turkey has not been willing to extend their anti-syrian rhetoric. however, the turkish prime minister is quite had strong. if he continues to be provoked by syrian shelling, he may take action. this is why in recent days, following the shelling, forcing down a jet flying to damascus, russia is trying to ply the situation and by increasing the supply of natural gas to turkey, making up for a short fly to iran to maintain good relations between russia and turkey despite what is happening in syria. in conclusion, moscow is taking a major middle east gamble with its policy in syria. if the gamble fails, and i think it will, hopefully if the u.s. get a little more active in the process, moscow's middle east policy will be in deep trouble. thank you. >> thank you very much.
now, is a strong china and a strong united states to lead the rest of the world out of this growing recession and to pick on china with a trade war-like statement is not what the markets wanted to hear. martha: interesting. stuart, thank you so. bill: we'll see a drop at open. watch that. we're just getting started, folks. what was behind governor romney's strategy last night? we'll talk to the man who played president obama during the debate prep. senator robb portman and his home state of ohio. >> lots to talk about with him. heated exchange over the war in iraq and the effect the white house has on the future of that country. did president obama undo the progress that was made in iraq? former secretary of defense under president george w. bush, donald rumsfeld, is here on that. bill: also the hits keep coming, martha. herman cain on the economy and the issue of presidential leadership. >> every time you've offered an opinion you've been wrong. >> attacking me is not an agenda. at shell, we believe the world needs a broader mix of energies. that's why we're supplying natural gas t
arabian students in the united states. and i take pride in partnering with the cultural ministry for their tireless effort and the support of the students and their families. i would also give a special shout out to the mission here for their efforts in opening medical training and education here in the states, which have often been closed. by the way, education does not count in our trade numbers. but it is important. while i am reluctant to do math in public, if you multiply 60,000 by 100,000 a year stipend per year -- that represents an annual investment of about $6 billion into our education system. it is good for us, as well as the saudis. on our end, education and the education office works tirelessly to prepare students for their experience here. and to also educate potential students on the opportunity. as i've often said to the ambassador, i know of no area where two embassies were closer together. but the shared interest in education goes well beyond the students. saudi arabia is building new universities for men and women all over the kingdom. they have gone from eight
's happened in europe should serve as an example for financial leaders in the united states as well as here in japan. he said waiting until the strains become clearer just leads to harsher outcomes. vinals says japan's high level of debt presents a stability risk and said the government leaders need to deal with budget problems. they pointed to commercial bank holdings of government bonds as yet another risk. they project in five years bonds could make up a third of those banks' total assets and they warned those institutions would suffer heavy losses if interest rates rose. now, vinals said japanese leaders need to be more vigilant about their risks. i had a chance to speak with him about some of the problems and some of the solutions. mr. vinals, you spoke this morning about japan remaining a concern. you're saying that the sovereign debt could become fully a third of bank assets in five years. holding that many assets obviously puts the banks at risk if bond prices plummet, so how would you say is the best way out of this that's least disruptive to the economy? >> i think that the best w
to the world of finance and business in the united states. the wait is going to work today to see and i are going to have this conversation for a few minutes and then we will open it up to you for your questions. one or two conflicts of interest in the table. jpmorgan chase is a corporate member of the council on foreign relations. whenever a 175 corporate converse amanda shareholders the company. i'm forsch landed distinct minority shareholder and i wish it weren't have to present a conflict, but alas it's not. so there you go. mr. dimon is suspect and if you know is that greek heritage. in the last 24 hours the chancellor of germany has been visiting the country of your ancestors of their forebears. how worried are you and what it might mean, not just for grace and not sonatas for europe, but because of globalization and economic linkages for the united states and for your own institution. >> thank you for your introduction. my ancestors 1915 chemists you can't blame me for what's going on there. as a sidenote now, meant my grandfather coming home years ago and greeks from both sides
, russia and consider rush-hour number one enemy." #3, it angers and alienates the united states. and increasingly irritates turkey. why is russia doing this? there is continued disunity in the ranks of the rebels, although after this morning, there's another chance they say to reunify. hopefully, scout, think they won't be able to oust assad. turkey has not been willing to extend their anti-syrian rhetoric. however, the turkish prime minister is quite had strong. if he continues to be provoked by syrian shelling, he may take action. this is why in recent days, following the shelling, forcing down a jet flying to damascus, russia is trying to ply the situation and by increasing the supply of natural gas to turkey, making up for a short fly to iran to maintain good relations between russia and turkey despite what is happening in syria. in conclusion, moscow is taking a major middle east gamble with its policy in syria. if the gamble fails, and i think it will, hopefully if the u.s. get a little more active in the process, moscow's middle east policy will be in deep trouble. thank
manufacturer in the world. it used to be the united states of america. >> governor, you're the last person who will get tough on china. >> we have iran four years closer to a nuclear bomb. >> when folks go after americans, we go after them. campaign 2012, a presidential debate. from boca raton, florida, here is scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, it was 50 years ago tonight that president john f. kennedy went on national television to announce that the soviet union had set up missile sites in cuba and he demanded that they be removed. the world was on the brink of nuclear war. it is a reminder of the kind of crisis a commander-in-chief can face. and it comes as as the candidates for president hold their final debate tonight, focusing on foreign policy. with the race still very tight, both president obama and mitt romney have a lot to gain and a lot to lose in their final joint appearance before a national audience. it might be their last best chance to win over the uncommitted voters who will decide the election, which is now just two weeks away. for tonight's debate, the candidates will be
and they can say that the president of the united states and united states of america has stood on the right side of history. >> brian: with the arab spripping nothing positive. >> steve: i was amazed romney didn't bring up the muslim brotherhood ledd to extremist back in power. >> but the women's vote in the debate. one of the big things romney accomplished talking about how he is peace love not support war and he didn't think we needed to go to war in iran or send froopps in syria and all of that stuff was to debunk the idea the idea that he is a warmongered. women were worried he was a bush 43 shoot fromm the hip and he over that. the main thing that happened last night was not foreign policy. romney won the economic debate . obama's view on the economy is ridiculouss and doesn't defend his record well i think it will continue. rumny's momentum to the nomination. i think it will be unslackened and accelerate and more confident than ever we will have rum rhumb will have a land slide. 48 percent in the popular and 300 to 350 in the electoral vote. >> brian: out on a limb. >> i live on the l
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 283 (some duplicates have been removed)